Archive for the ‘Tips and Hints’ Category

What Product Do I Need?

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

You have so many products, what product do I need to recover my data?

Let us start with the basic questions, is the drive a single drive or do you have an array of drives?

Let us start with single drives. If the drive is a single drive, was the drive originally an internal or external drive?

If the drive is internal, then you should use GetDataBack for NTFS. Download the demo version and let it scan the drive and see if your data is recoverable.

If the drive is external, then it is formatted out of the box as FAT32 most of the time. However if you have ever formatted the drive yourself, then the drive would be NTFS as Windows XP and above only allows you to format drives over 32GB as NTFS. So if the drive has not been formatted, then use GetDataBack for FAT, otherwise use GetDataBack for NTFS. Either way, if it does not find your files, the software will recommend that you use the other version. So download the demo version and let it scan the drive and see if your data is recoverable.

Lets talk about arrays now. There are quite a few different options
for arrays. Is the array from a PC or a NAS?

If the array is from a NAS, you will need to follow the instructions located here in order to run any of our RAID software. Once the drives are all attached to the non-raid controller, you can see if the demo version of NAS Data Recovery will find the parameters. Start the software and select the drives that are part of the array and click next. If it finds the parameters, click next in the software to see if it can mount the volume. Did the volume mount successfully?

If the volume does mount, you have the ability to test certain file types by right clicking on them and selecting view. This works with jpg files, so test a few files and see if the data can be recovered successfully, then you will need to purchase the license key in order to save the data.

NAS Data Recovery software reads the file system and gives you access to it, so if your data does not appear when you click next, it is just because there is some type of file system damage. We do not have a file recovery tool for any of the NAS file systems, so if your data does not appear, you should find another solution for recovering your data.

If the array is from a PC, you will need to follow the instructions located here in order to run any of our RAID software. You will have multiple options now on how you can recover your data and view it. So you will need to choose the correct software. We will go over all the options with the easiest to the hardest.

The easiest option is to use the demo version of RAID Recovery for Windows software. Start the software and select the drives that are part of the array and click next. If it finds the parameters, click next in the software to see if it can mount the volume. Did the volume mount successfully?

If the volume does mount, you have the ability to test certain file types by right clicking on them and selecting view. This works with jpg files, so test a few files and see if the data can be recovered successfully, then you will need to purchase the license key in order to save the data.

RAID Recovery for Windows software reads the file system to give you access to the data, so if your data does not appear when you click next, it is just because there is some type of file system damage. At this point you will need to use RAID Reconstructor followed by GetDataBack for NTFS for the recovery. That is covered next.

If RAID Recovery for Windows does not mount the volume successfully, then you should move to RAID Reconstructor. Add all the drives that belong to the array and click Open drives, then click Analyze. Allow the analysis to complete and the software will say give you one of two responses. It will say either “Recommendation” or it will say “This Result is not Significant”. Which response did you receive?

If you received “Recommendation”, then the parameters of the array were found successfully. You will need to purchase the software in order to save any of the outputs listed in step 3. Once you have purchased the license, you can save to three different options, a virtual image, a full image, or write the data to a new physical disk. If you want the quickest option of these three, you will choose the option for the virtual image. It is a small 1kb XML document that tells the rest of our software how to pull the data from the drives on the fly. The second option is to create a full image. It will make an image file that is the size of the array. So if you have a 3TB array, you will need 3TB of data to save the image to. The third option is to write the data to a physical disk. This will require you to have a drive or array that is the same size as the original or larger. It will erase all data on this drive. Now if you ran Raid Recovery for Windows and it did not produce any files, this will only result in a new volume with the same issues your current array has, so it is not recommended in this case.

If you receive “This Result is not Significant”, there are a number of reasons this could happen. The first reason is the drive uses a proprietary rotation. The second reason if there is major file system damage that prevents the software from determining the parameters correctly. The third reason is there are drives that are missing or do not belong to the array. This could happen if you think you have a 4 drive array, but in actuality, you have a 3 drive array with a hot spare. If you include all 4 drives, then the analysis will fail. Luckily we have a RaidProbe service that can resolve most of these issues and we can give you the parameters of the array so you can continue your recovery. You can find more information about it at http://www.runtime.org/raid.htm#raidprobe

Once you have created your output in RAID Reconstructor, you can install the demo version of GetDataBack for NTFS. Then choose your scenario in the first screen, but do not use the default option. Choose the option for Systematic or Sustained file system damage.

If you created the virtual image, in step 1, choose the selection Virtual Images (Load more…). Then click next to scan the virtual image. Once the scan finishes, choose the best file system in step 2 and click next to see your data. You will have the ability to double click on certain files to ensure the data is recoverable. If you wish to recover your data, you will need to purchase a license.

If you created a full image, in step 1, choose the select Image files (Load more…). Then click next to scan the full image file. Once the scan finishes, choose the best file system in step 2 and
click next to see your data. You will have the ability to double click on certain files to ensure the data is recoverable. If you wish to recover your data, you will need to purchase a license.

There are a few other scenarios that have not been covered. The first is an array that just has file system damage but is still structurally intact, meaning the drives are still attached to the controller and in working order, but for example the volume was formatted or damaged.

In a Windows array, you can just use GetDataBack for NTFS as the array will show as one physical drive that you can select in step 1 of GetDataBack for NTFS.

In a NAS array under these same circumstances, we do not have a recovery option. You will need to find a different way to recover the data.

The second scenario is for an array that the controller has just died. The drives are intact and there is no file system damage, just the controller has died.

If the array is a windows array and if you just want the data, you can run Raid Recovery for Windows. You should be able to see your data and recover it all. However if the array was bootable for example, it will not be after the data is copied, as the software does not copy the partition table or boot sector.

If the array is a windows array and it matches the scenario of the controller being dead, and you want to restore the array to a working volume, then you should use RAID Reconstructor and in step 3, you will want to choose the option for physical disk and you will need a physical volume that is exactly the same size (Be careful here, A 2TB Western Digital is not the exact same size as a 2TB Seagate or any other brand) or larger. Write the array volume back to the drive, and then you will need to restart the computer in order to see the data! If you do not restart, the volume will show up as blank. A restart is required for the OS to see the new data on the drive. You should have full access to the data after the restart and if the array was bootable, it should be so now as well. If for some reason, after the restart, the drive is not showing correctly, this is due to some type of file system damage and you should run GetDataBack for NTFS on the volume to recover the data.

If you encounter a scenario that is not listed, contact us and we can tell you the best way to recover the data. Email us using our support@runtime.org email address or call us; 808-329-2202.

Case Study #1 – Recovering from a deleted partition

Tuesday, May 15th, 2012

We are going to be starting a new series here at Runtime Software; Case Studies. Real life data recovery scenario’s that we can hopefully help you with.

Case Study #1 – Recovering from a deleted partition

  • Hard Drive: secondary drive – 128GB SSD with music on it.
  • Operating System: Windows 7 – 32bit
  • Software used: GetDataBack for NTFS
  • Chance of Recovery: 100% as long as nothing else was written to the drive
  • Notes: This drive is the secondary drive. If the drive you need to recover is your primary drive, that will be covered in a future case study

Steps to take

  1. Download GetDataback for NTFS from our website at http://runtime.org/data-recovery-products.htm.
  2. Be sure to run the software as Administrator (right click on the GetDataBack icon and select Run As Administrator).
  3. In the first step of the software, select Quick Scan.
  4. Select your physical drive from the list of available drives and click Next. If you do not see your drive, close the software and see step 2 again.
  5. When you get to step 2, select the top file system and click Next.
  6. In step 3, you should be able to see your files that were in your partition. You have the ability to open them and test them, however in order to save your files, you will need to purchase the software from our website at http://www.runtime.org/buy_now.htm.

Notes: The software can not fix or repair your drive. You will need another place to save the data to. This can be another internal drive or even an external USB for Firewire drive. You will need to purchase the software before you save the data. The demo allows you to ensure the files are recoverable before you need to make a purchase.

If you run into problems with any of these steps, let us know right away so we can help you.


The difference between the demo version and the full version.

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

We get this question a lot. What is the difference between the demo version of your software and the paid version? The demo version is only there so you can see your files and even open some of them. The only time you should ever purchase the software is after you have run the demo, you can see the files you want to recover and you are ready to recover them.

The only difference between the demo and the full version is the ability to save your data. This is true for GetDataBack, DiskExplorer, Captain Nemo, RAID Reconstructor, NAS Data Recovery and RAID Recovery for Windows. If you are purchasing the software, you have already tested it and are sure it can do what you need it to do.

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NAS Data Recovery Video Tutorial

Tuesday, February 1st, 2011

We have a new video tutorial for our NAS Data Recovery software in three different locations, YouTube, at Vimeo, and an iPad/iPhone 1080p version here.

The YouTube version is only 720P and is below:

Vimeo has a 1080p version and is below, this works on iPad and iPhones as well:

If you have any questions about this software, please call us at 808-239-2202, or email us at support@runtime.org.

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A warning about formatting your drive in Vista and Windows 7

Wednesday, July 14th, 2010

We just want to warn people about formatting their drives in Windows Vista and Windows 7. If you uncheck the option for quick format, the operating system does a full destructive format, making data recovery impossible once it is finished.

So unless you are giving your drive away, or selling it, do not do a full format if there is a chance you will need the data on the drive, as the data will no longer be there, or recoverable.

Be sure you have the option for quick format selected.

Fixing Error 8000FFFF in DriveImage XML

Thursday, April 2nd, 2009

We have created a video tutorial regarding error 8000FFFF and how to fix it on YouTube. Here is the list of files that are needed to be run from the command prompt and they need to be run from the Windows\System32 folder. A high quality version of the movie can be found here (WARNING!! This file is 100MB in size).

  • Net stop vss
  • Net stop swprv
  • regsvr32 ole32.dll
  • regsvr32 vss_ps.dll
  • Vssvc /Register
  • regsvr32 /i swprv.dll
  • regsvr32 /i eventcls.dll
  • regsvr32 es.dll
  • regsvr32 stdprov.dll
  • regsvr32 vssui.dl – (For Windows 2003 only)
  • regsvr32 msxml.dll
  • regsvr32 msxml3.dll
  • regsvr32 msxml4.dll
  • Net start vss
  • Net start wsprv

Some info for people using Shadow Copy and Windows XP…

Friday, August 29th, 2008

Here is some good information for people using Shadow Copy and Windows XP. You can avoid having to reactivate XP by simply copying a file from your Windows directory and saving it on a USB stick, floppy drive, or CD. When you first activated Windows, XP creates a file called “WPA.DBL” and stores it in the C:\WINDOWS\SYSTEM32 directory.
shadowcopy1.jpg
Open Windows Explorer and click Tools>Folder Options
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Click the view tab, select the following options
shadowcopy3.jpg
Go to the Windows\System32 folder and copy the wba.dbl file and save it a CD, floppy, or USB drive.
shadowcopy4.jpg
Now you can use Shadow Copy to copy the OS to another drive. Once it is done, boot into safe mode.
shadowcopy5.jpg
Click yes that you know you are in safe mode
shadowcopy6.jpg
Open Windows Explorer and go to the Windows\system32 folder, rename the exsisting file to wba.old and paste the saved file back into the folder.
shadowcopy7.jpg

Reboot and you do not need to reactivate windows.

Remember that this will only work if you use the WPA.DBL file on the same computer that it was originally activated on. If you install XP on a different machine and try to copy the WPA.DBL file there, it won’t activate. Basically, XP looks at the hardware of the computer to create a unique profile for just that one computer. If you change the hardware to many times, it will also not work as activation looks for hardware changes as well. This should easily work for a single drive change though.

Making a partial image in DiskExplorer

Wednesday, July 16th, 2008

Lets have a look at making a partial image in DiskExplorer. This is important when making an image of a drive with damage.

Lets start DiskExplorer:

1.gif

Switch to hex mode my pressing F3 and go to sector you want to start the image at:

2.gif

Once the sector is selected, press CTRL-SHIFT-END and it will select the sector you chose to the end of the drive:

3.gif

Now, click on Edit>Copy to file:

5.gif

Pick the file name and location and click save. You can see the size of the image at the top of the file location box.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact us at info@runtime.org.

Why does your software crash under Vista or Server 2008?

Wednesday, July 9th, 2008

This is because of our copy protection. There is an easy way to fix this though inside Vista and Server 2008.

When you start our software in Vista or Server 2008, you may get a screen that looks like this:

Click on the option to close the program. Then to fix this, you need to go to your run command and type the following:

You will be given the System Properties box. Click on Advanced -> Performance Settings:

You will then arrive at Performance Options. Click on Data Execution Prevention:

Click the add button and path to whatever version of our software you are using. We used RAID Reconstructor in this case. RAID Reconstructor should be C:\Program Files\Runtime Software\RAID Reconstructor\raid.exe. All of our software will be found in C:\Program Files\Runtime Software\.

Once RAID Reconstructor is in the list, click OK to close the Performance Options and OK again to close System Properties

Go ahead and start any of our software, and it should work with no problems now.

Four scenario options in step 1

Wednesday, April 16th, 2008

Q: What are the four options I am presented with when starting GetDataBack for FAT or GetDataBack for NTFS?

A: These options change the settings that are used when scanning the drive for data. Lets go into each one in detail.

Option #1 – I don’t know use default settings:

This option leaves all settings turned off. It does not recover deleted files, lost files, duplicate file names, and it does not do an excessive search.

Option #2 – Systematic file system damage, e.g. Format or FDisk:

This turns on none of the options as well.

Option #3 – Sustained file system damage, e.g. a new operating system was installed

This turns on the option to recover deleted files and allows duplicate file names to be recovered.

Options #4 – I want to recover deleted files

This also turns on the option to recover deleted files and allows duplicate file names to be recovered.

You can find all of these options by clicking on Tools>Options.

You can then click the environment tab for additional options.

Stayed tune for the next post. We will go over what each of the options really do.